Mango Malasadas

  • PREP TIME6 hours

  • COOK TIME1 hour

  • TOTAL TIME

  • SERVINGS20

Malasadas are Portuguese style donuts that have been adapted by the Hawaiian culture. It is an enriched dough with eggs and milk or cream. In Hawaii, the version there includes fillings normally of custards and local fruits. Here, I created a dough that contains additional fresh mango puree as well as solely mango fruit as the filling. I also use garam masala spice in the sugar coat at the end to bring a nice aroma and unique flavor aspect to accentuate the malasada. This can be enjoyed for any holiday or celebratory gathering.

*Recipe courtesy of Chef Sally Camacho, Sally CM, LLC

Mango Malasadas

  • SHARE:

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp Active Dry Yeast
  • 3 each Whole Eggs
  • 3/4 cup Fresh Mango Puree
  • 1/2 cup Heavy Cream
  • 1/2 cup Granulated Sugar
  • 3.5 cup All-purpose Flour
  • 1/2 tsp Sea Salt
  • 1/4 tsp Nutmeg, ground
  • 3 tbsp Butter, cold and cubed
  • 6 cup Vegetable Fry Oil
  • 1 cup Granulated Sugar
  • 1 tbsp Garam Masala Spice
  • 5-6 each Fresh Mangos
  • Powdered Sugar (as needed)
  • PREP TIME 6 hours

  • COOK TIME1 hour

  • TOTAL TIME

  • SERVINGS20

Malasadas are Portuguese style donuts that have been adapted by the Hawaiian culture. It is an enriched dough with eggs and milk or cream. In Hawaii, the version there includes fillings normally of custards and local fruits. Here, I created a dough that contains additional fresh mango puree as well as solely mango fruit as the filling. I also use garam masala spice in the sugar coat at the end to bring a nice aroma and unique flavor aspect to accentuate the malasada. This can be enjoyed for any holiday or celebratory gathering.

*Recipe courtesy of Chef Sally Camacho, Sally CM, LLC

Instructions

  1. In an electric mixer with the paddle attachment, combine the dry yeast, eggs, mango puree, and heavy cream. Mix on speed one to combine, about 1 minute. Next, add sugar, all-purpose flour, sea salt, ground nutmeg, and cubed cold butter. Mix on speed 1 for 4 minutes. Switch to medium speed and mix for 4minutes. With a plastic dough scraper or rubber spatula, scrap the dough from the sides of the bowl and off the paddle attachment to ensure homogenous mixing. Mix for another 4 minutes on medium speed. Scrap the bowl and paddle once again. Continue to mix on medium speed for another 4-6 minutes or until the gluten develops. You want to check for this by taking a small amount of dough and stretching it into a windowpane. The dough should stretch about 8 inches and as thin as piece of parchment paper.

    Once this is achieved, transfer the dough into a greased smell free container that is large enough for the dough to triple in volume. Cover the dough tightly and allow to sit a warm area freefrom draft, or 80-82 degrees Fahrenheit for 3 hours to rest and bulk ferment.

  2. After the dough has rested, divide the dough in 20 equal pieces. This is a very sticky dough. To handle it, you will need to use some vegetable oil on your hands and working surface. Place 3”x3” pieces of parchment onto a greased sheet tray. Round the dough pieces into smooth balls and place each one on a piece of parchment. With your hands, press the dough to flatten to about 2 1/2 inches in diameter.

  3. After all the dough is shaped and flattened, cover the sheet tray tightly and allow the malasadas to proof for about 1 ½-2 hours at room temperature, or at 72-74 degrees Fahrenheit. The malasadas will double in size and be very soft.

  4. To fry the malasadas, in a pot with a depth of 6 inches and 10 inches in diameter,heat the vegetable oil to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Use a kitchen thermometer to check the oil temperature. Once the oil is at temperature, carefully lay the malasadas into the oil using the parchment paper, place the malasadas parchment side down into the oil.

  5. Once the malasadas are a light brown, turn over using chopsticks or tongs. Remove the parchment paper from the oil. They will release with ease from the malasadas at this point.

    Once the malasadas are a medium dark brown, turn over to fully brown the side that had the parchment.

    Once evenly brown, remove from oil and place on a paper towel lined tray to drain.Continue to fry the malasadas. Take care to not over crowd the pot as this may lower the oil temperature and the malasadas will soak in the oil rather than frying in it.

  6. For the sugar coating, combine the cup of granulated sugar with the garam masala spice in a bowl with at least a 10 inch diameter, and mix. While still warm, toss the malasadas in the sugar mixture 2 or 3 at a time to cover the entire surface of the malasada.

  7. To make the fresh mango filling, peel and de-seed mangos. Dice the mangos into a medium dice. Take the fruit from one mango and blend it into a smooth puree. Mix the cut mango with the mango puree.

  8. Once the malasadas are cool enough to handle, make an incision cutting the malasada about half way into it to create a pocket. Stuff this pocket with the mango filling. Dust malasadas with powdered sugar and serve.